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captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama returned to washington today after winning the electoral college, the popular vote and a second term. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, kwame holman wraps up the results and the reaction and ray suarez reports from chicago on the president's day. >> woodruff: we assess the tactics that led to success for the obama campaign and failure for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these instit
of sandy play out? >> it will play out good for president obama. in a time of disaster, the only elected officials who have opportunity to perform our governors, mayors, with the president. all the senators and members of congress are dying to get on camera. chuck schumer is the only one i know who did. this is a real job. the president handled himself well and showed himself to be compassionate, as governor christie said, and christy "endorsement" of the president is nothing but a plus. >> nina? >> you really have to notice here that president clinton built up fema, the bush administration took it apart and then paid the price after katrina, and this president put it back up again and what not political people in, and it is paying off this week, it really is paying off. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the two candidates. here you have president obama citing fema as the vehicle to coordinate the federal effort, and you had mitt romney last year on the campaign saying he would get rid of fema, he would turn the responsibilities back to the states, showing no appreciati
. a closely fought campaign between president barack obama, and mitt romney, the former massachusetts governor, has come down to this night when tens of millions of voters finally have their say. >> ifill: it's just after 8:00 eastern time and the polls have now closed in almost half the states and the district of columbia, including 15 states that closed just hometowns ago. >> woodruff: there are now some fresh results to share with you, based on exit polling in key precincts and early returns, the networks have called the state of georgia for mitt romney. this is not a surprise. this is a state that went to john mccain four years ago, but just to recap, the state of kentucky has also been called for governor romney. the state of vermont going to barack obama, again, not a surprise. this is a very blue state. west virginia for governor romney. and i believe we have one other state, south carolina. all of these states so far, again, i guess you would kay, gwen, in the predictable column-- and indiana, one other state we have been able to call-- rather the associated press, or the networks. our
of t hispanic vote, that's also a big structural problem. the promise of barack obama in 2004, just to state the obvious, when he first sprang on natial attention with the "we're not red america, we're not blue america, we're not white, we're not black" that's been eviscerated. we clearly have an electorate that's divided in long term structural ways along racial lines. >> and regional lines. >> and the goal of either party would be -- and gender lines and the goal of either party would be to change that. >> rose: an election preview when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we enter the final hours of 2012's presidential election. tuesday may be the main event but tens of millions have already voted. reduction of early voting hours in key states have raised questions about the propriety of campaign tactics. both sides are preparing for possible legal challenges in a sign that the contest might continue beyond election day. president barack obama and governor romney have spent the day drumm
of the men who would be presidt. >> barack obama's a fascinating mixture of boldness and caution. >> when mitt romney gets focused and locked in, watch out. >> stories of family... >> stanley ann dunham was really a thoroughly unconventional mother. >> he had to fend for himself. every step, he was alone. >> the dad stuff just can't be underestimated. >> he had a lot of power to him. he was our hero. >> identity... >> he told his fifth-grade class that his father was an indonesian king. >> he was a white-black kid. >> his extended family is one of the leading mormon families. >> he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. >> controversy... >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> mitt romney doesn't have an ideological bone in his body, as far as i can tell. >> and destiny. >> what unites both of these characters is this sense that there was a place that they were going, a destiny that they had. >> tonight ofrontline, "the choice 2012." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the
with a recap of the markets. >>> u.s. president barack obama would be speaking to crowd after crowd in swing states if it hadn't been for the storm. he has less than a week to convince undecided voters. st americans have already examined his record over the past four years. he started his term with a sentiment offered by many of those who came before him. >> that america can change. our union can be perfected. >> many americans have grown tired of what their country had come to represent under george w. bush. obama promised change at home and abroad. he brought an end to the war in iraq. he said u.s. combat forces would pull out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. and he promised to decimate al qaeda. >> after a fire fight they killed osama bin laden and took custody of his body. we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al qaeda's terror, justice has been done. >> but some argue obama has not met expectations in the middle east. he's faced persistent trouble with a dominant player in the region, iran. he has focused foreign policy to make it more multilateral, part of what he
and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" president obama regains solid support among women voters just before the election. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news a socl trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the last-minute scuffle for voters: the ground game. early voting. cell phone polls and women voters dominated the final days of the presidential race. a late week "new york times" poll showed the gender gap re-emerge knowledge in president obama's favor. 52% of women and 44% of men support obama. while the g.o.p.'s mitt romney has 44% of women and1% of men in his corner. women voters in battleground states are the coveted demographic according to two campaign experts. >> i think if you look at the president has done with the economy, it is very far reaching, just across the country women have access to capital to start small business, let's not forget his very, very first bill that he signed in to law was lily ledbetter fair pay act. it's a tremendous accomplishment. i think that shows his devotion and his commit
encounter with president obama and he went to a town called sayerville where he went door to door meeting with the people who came out to talk to him, shake hands. he was bolstering their spirits but in some cases there were people who broke down in his arms and cried and he became more than the chief executive of this state, he became the consoleern chf, iyou ll. and that is a story that repeated itself a number of times later in the day. the governor and president obama took a helicopter ride over the area from atlantic city down to an area where the governor had told people to get off and in many cases they didn't and he kind of jokingly but firmly let them know when they were speaking a couple minutes after the video you're seeing right now, he let them know he was not happy with them but he'd give them a break this time around. but it's just a very, very kind of like -- this is a -- you know it's not a big state geographically but it's a very densely populated state and very diverse when it comes to geography as well. the highlands took a tremendous hit because that's where the winds
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: president obama and mitt romney sprinted through swing states making their final arguments on this day before election day. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we start with two reports from the candidates' command centers. ray suarez is in illinois, and margaret warner is in massachusetts. >> suarez: at obama campaign headquarters in chicago, they're confident of a narrow win. >> romney's strategists are counting on the undecided independent voters breaking his way. >> ifill: then, thousands of people in new york and new jersey are still without power, cold and in the dark even as schools and businesses reopen. kwame holman has our update, one week after the storm. >> woodruff: and special correspondent rick karr tells the story of a hard-hit brooklyn neighborhood struggling to get back on its feet. >> ifill: back on the campaign trail, we head to ohio, the ultimate battleground state, whervolunteersn both sides took to the streets this weekend. >> now that we
obama is back in the white house, democrats are back in control of the senate, and republicans are back running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 and a columnist for reuters. he is also the co-author with ross douthat of the much talked-about book, "grand new party: how republicans can win the working class and save the american dream." welcome to both of you
-election of president obama but it seems the mood was different on wall street. >> it really was. we're seeing the reactions following the elections. investors really concerned about tax and spending issues and that's going to be a major focus going forwd. government spending cults and tax hikes are set to go into effect at the end of the year. the so-called fiscal cliff. investors worry obama will be unable to resolve the crisis with the house of representatives still controlled by the republicans. the key index on the new york stock exchange fell sharply when markets reopened after the election. the dow jones industrial average at one point lost over 360 points. the index finished the day at 12,932, down 2.3% from the previous day's close. new york stocks dliped from the start as investor concerns shifted to how obama will address the country's economic challenges. they're particularly worried the fiscal cliff could weigh down u.s. growth into the new year. >> it's a pretty sad day for wall street. >> i don't think it's for the best of the country. i had a good feeling that romney was going
in the obama win. behind the headlines, the challenges faced by returning women veterans. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, women make history. executive producer cari stein has that story. >> a record number of women will hold u.s. senate seats in january. after victories in massachusetts, north dakota, hawaii, wisconsin and nebraska, five new female senators will be on capitol hill. that's 20 women senators, a net gain othre for massachusetts, north dakota, hawaii, and wisconsin, these women are the first female senators from their states. hawaii's mazie hirono will be the first asian-american female senator, and wisconsin's tammy baldwin the first openly gay senator. at least 77, possibly 79 women will take their seats in the house of representatives, only a modest gain. the number of democratic women in the house will rise from 51 to 63. republicans added one woman. in new hampshire, another first. the election of a female governor and two women to the house, makes it the first state to be le
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama hailed another month of job growth, while mitt romney cited an up-tick in the unemployment rate as proof of an economic standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's ar. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% o
download. >> take a look at this, the obama campaign spent $47 million on digital sending. and the romney campaign spent 4 my 7 million. a 10 to 1 gap. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fromiers like you
-election of barack obama. those in afghanistan and pakistan may not have cheered his victory. obama will oversea the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan by the end of 2014. that's a number of challenges in the region. >> reporter: afghanistan and pakistan are affected by the fights. about 100,000 american troops were stationed in afghanistan. the number has fallen toess than 7000 d furtr reductions are planned. others worry the withdrawal could plunge the country back into unstable world. dialogue between the united states and taliban were suspended earlier this year. during the election campaign obama distanced himself from the issue to avoid being branded weak on terrorism. with the election behind him the president may become more flexible. here in pakistan relations with washington are expected to remain tense. the two sides differ over how to handle elements of al qaeda and other militants hiding in remote areas of pakistan near the afghanistan border. the obama administration has said they're not doing enough to comfort terrorists operationing on pakistani soil. the u.s. have
endorsed barack obama for re-election, just take another look at the widespread havoc caused by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's glol warming, stupidif hurrine sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. and as a consequence, i think we've got an obligation to future generations to do something about it. >> but he made it clear that actually doing something about it will take a back seat to the economy for now. he did return to new york on thursday to review the recovery effort on staten island. climate change and hurricane sandy brought naomi klein to town, too. you may know her as the author of "the shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism." readers of two influential magazines to put naomi klein high o
"mandate" at all this year? except as maybe what chris chriie and president obama went on? aside from that it's not -- it hasn't been part of the conversation and all of us, the voters, particularly in states that are not deep red or deep blue have a certain obligation to give their lawmakers the room to cast a couple of votes that might get them-- many my favorite washington verb-- primaried. when you talk to these guys, when the cameras are away, they say the real problem here is not so much the general election it's that if we vote vote with the other side on a couple of big things which is what a fiscal deal is going to require then we're going to get hit by people who think we aren't pure enough so we are punishing compromise at just the moment we need. the middle way is not always the right way, but sometimes it is. >> we are punishing compromise, but we also need leaders in congress who will be courageous enough, have the debts as well as the -- the depth as well as the stamina to really make a difference. what we didn't say is that the president's going to have to do right aft
heard from republicans -- it is like mitch mcconnell who said his job was to see that obama is never reelected. so, he has an edge year. he does have leverage. but it will be a long haul. he does need partners. >> rich mcconnell is on record as saying that -- mitch mcconnell is on the records sayi thahe knows that the election makes some people think that the republicans are going to roll over. that does not sound like compromise. >> your definition of compromise is rolling over and excepting higher tax rates. that is the democratic definition of compromise. i would never suggest bias. the president ran -- i will say it -- the most negative campaign. he did not run on his record. he could not. he did not run on a program. there is one thing he got a mandate for, and he now has a mandate to raise the top tax rate on two percent of the population by four. ? that is the smallest mandate in american history. >> can i say something? >> no, not until i am done. this is true. i am not going to get into this for meridian -- >what the republicans will agree to come up brainer came out with --
, the nasdaq rose 12, and the s&p added 11 pois. polls show that president obama and governor romney are in a tight race. ultimately, voters in a few key states will have the final say on who wins the white house. florida is one of those important battleground states. tom is in miami with more. tom. >> tom: susie, florida is the biggest swing state prize with the most electoral votes up for grabs. the economy, healthcare and immigration all are on display re wh flida'diverse and growing population. voters in south florida today packed their umbrellas for the hot sun, and patience in some precincts. it's been a tight race in the sunshine state. compared to four years ago, it was a harder time deciding whom to vote for, for her. >> this time it came to the nitty gritty, they were fighting about real things, jobs, health care and i think they both have very good points. >> reporter: for her the decision came down to health care and medical insurance coverage, supporting president obama's effort to reform the industry. but natalie felt differently. >> there's a lot of changes in health c
's election. according to exit polls, president obama won a slight majority of catholic voters overall, thanks largely to strong support from latino catholics. mitt romney won the white catholic vote by an almost 20-point margin. almost 80% of evangelicals who voted voted for romney. black protestants went overwhelmingly for obama, as did the vast majority of jews. but the biggest share of obama's faith coalition was voters who say they aren't affiliated with any religion. steve schneck was co-chair of catholics for obama. he says while issues like abortion, religious liberty and gay marriage were important, in the end, it was the economy that tipped the scale for the president. >> all of these religious issues, while they are important to religious voters, i think, even among religious voters, they ranked these issues a little further down on the spectrum. >> ralph reed of the faith and freedom coalition admitted that a massive mobilization among religious conservatives wasn't enough to offset the number of women, young people and minorities who voted democratic. >> i think we need to do a be
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama said today he believes a framework for a debt-cutting deal can be reached in the coming weeks. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the efforts to resolve the impasse over tax hikes and spending cuts. >> brown: then, we get two views of a palestinian bid for limited statehood, ahead of a key vote tomorrow at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama adm
on the presidential campaigns. president obama took time off to tour some of the devastated areas of new jersey with governor chris christie. he promised that his administration would not forget the people suffering there. meanwhile, governor mitt romney held a relief rally in the battleground state of ohio for victims of sandy. he urged americans outside the affected areas to help out in any way they can. inthese fil days befe e electn, both candidates are ramping up efforts to mobilize voters, including their faith-based supporters. kim lawton has been leading our coverage of the campaigns. she looks at the many ways religion has played a role this time around. >> both campaigns continue their active efforts to get their constituencies out to the polls next week. professor john green of the bliss institute at the university of akron says in a tight election, the campaigns look to the coalitions they can rely upon, and that includes faith coalitions. >> each side understands that every vote will count. >> green says while faith-based outreach hasn't dominated this campaign season, it has conti
tightening. >>> president barack obama and mitt romney are making their final pitches before americans head to the polls. obama visited three swing states. he told a crowd in wisconsin that romney would resurrect the republican policies of four years ago and preserve tax cuts for the wealthy. >> it's a choice between returning to the top down policies that crashed our economy or a future that's built on providing opportunity to everybody and growing a strong middle class. >> romney also campaigned in swing states. he told an audience in florida that obama had failed to deliver on promises to reduce the economic burden on americans. >> tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. tomorrow we begin a better tomorrow. this nation is going to begin to change for the better tomorrow. >> the latest poll from abc news and the washington post suggests 50% of likely voters will cast their ballots for obama. 47% for romney. polls indicate a close race in eight states. some suggest the candidates are running even. others give obama a narrow lead. >> the economy is what i think is numbe one. >> health care. >> ne
or president obama didn't do in the last four years i'm going to lay out the plan. here it is. some people in my party weent be happy, the other party won't be happy but here's my plan and let's work on this starting with my framework. >> rose: tom. >> the morning after whoever wins, the first thing i hope he does is call the leadership of the other side. make clear that we have some big hard things to do and we can only do them together. these are too big and hard for any party to deal alone. i think the gges andarde is we do need a grand bargain on debt deficit and taxes. that it stays in at an appropriate way at the proper scale. and at the same time we need to be a start-up country again. there's no employees, charlie, without employers. and it seems to me that the next president has got to reach out to the other party for starters but also to the business in the innovation community to make clear we're going to have a puic/pvateartnship to make this a truly start up nation again that's going to get everybody in this country starting something. so we can get more people back to work.
-- is not a biographer to come on, colby. >> is the obama administration guilty of a cover-up in the benghazi attack? >> i think she knew better, and if she did no better, she should not be the voice of america. . >> for them to go after the u.n. ambassador, who had nothing to do with benghazi, and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence she had received, and to besmirch her reputation, is outrageous. >> they're talking about our u.n. ambassador, who could be the president's nominee to be secretary of state. this is about her appearance on talk shows on september 16 following the september 11 attacks in benghazi. charles krauthammer, our friend here, who is off this week -- i think he is in miami traveling -- has been hammering away at this for weeks but he said that it was fun cover story in the run-up to the election. what do we know about this? .> we don't know yet maybe the intelligence committees have some notion, but we really don't know yet. they are still conducting the investigation within the state department. it seems like there were 85 things going on at once. i am not cle
research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving r economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers li you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers had high hopes that cyber monday sales would add to what's been a strong start so far. >> if all goes as expected, today will end up being the busiest online david year, with major bargains and steep discountses just a click away. >> every year we see more and more consumers shopping is online, both the younger compute
on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it was freshman welcome day in washington. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell lost ground in the election, but he posed for the cameras with the three new senators who will be joining his side of the aisle in january. in the house, minority leader nancy pelosi beamed as she presented the new faces adding to democratic ranks in the coming congress. given what awaits these new lawmakers in january, you might wonder why they want the job. it's still not clear whether a lame duck session of congress will navigate th
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama was back at the white house today and congress returns to washington early next week. top on the agenda for both: a looming fiscal crisis. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the task ahead in negotiations to avoid an economic hit from automatic spending cuts and tax increases. >> brown: then, we examine what's next for the republican party, after a second straight presidential campaign rebuke from a changing american electorate. >> woodruff: the associated press still hasn't called a winner in florida. why not? and why were the lines so long at some polling places across the country? ray suarez gets some answers. >> brown: john merrow tells the story of pediatricians with a new prescription: books to build better brains. >> there's solid research that shows that just that intervention of handing a family a book, giving them a couple of age-appropriate pieces of advice about how to read with their kid and just encouraging reading, they--
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown repos onhe btle of the grod ga, ha fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 0 years. bnf, t engine that
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight, a conversation about president obama's second term with his former chief of staff bill daley. >> so all of these people who've questioned his credibility, questioned his validity got to stop this craziness and try to help him solve the problems for the american people. i think there's got to be a real -- he's got to reach out more, i'll gant you that. but they have to stop this craziness that they've been doing and reach back. >> rose: and to put all these political questions in context, we turn to doris kearns goodwin, the presidential biographer. >> and when you hear him give that speech last night he's thinking in terms of a story. he's connected to those people. he's telling the public there "your work is not done, i need you to push me from the outside in." that's what he needs to get hiss programs through. >> rose: bill daley and doris kearns goodwin when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama has been reelected as president o the
20th. >>> u.s. president barack obama declared his intention to raise taxes on wealthy americans. he says he wants to discuss this openly with republicans who control the house of representatives. obama on wednesday held his first news conference since re-election. he expressed strong concern about expiring tax cuts and automatic spending cuts referred to as the fiscal cliff. unless lawmakers can agree by the end of this year to extend the tax cuts for middle class, the economy could plummet. >> we should not hold the middle class hostage while we debate tax cuts for the wealthy. we should at least do what we agree on, and that's to keep middle class taxes lower. >> obama stressed the u.s. cannot afford to extend tax cuts for the wealthiest 2% of the population if it wants to reduce the country's mounting deficit. obama asked for cooperation from republicans. he said he is open to compromise and open to new ideas that could bring about a rise in tax revenues. >>> let's check on the markets. first, looking at currencies. just having a look at the dollar similar yen at 80.19-21. that's
resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama addressed the looming fiscal crisis for the first time since the election, and insisted once again he won't accept a deal unless it includes higher taxes on the wealthy. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we'll have excerpts from the predent remksand r own debate on the economic challenges ahead with two senators, maryland democrat ben cardin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four oer yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newsho
news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff. more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought into the fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak. >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it might take days before we know who will occupy the oval office. that's a scary flash back to the hanging chad debacle of the 2000 election. >> i think the odds are against it. i shudder to think. but, you remember how bad it was back in 2000. it was crazy, it drove people crazy, it drove the market crazy. i don't think that happens. i think one of these guys wins handily. >> reporter: and, then there are those who believe the stock market will rally no matter who wins tomorrow. that's because at least some uncertainty will finally be removed from the market. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now fo
obama, we had taken a defensive stance already. we had gone slightly underweight equities, and added more things like high-yield mortgage debt, emerging market debt, and mortgage-backed securities, that will yield as much as capital appreciation, and investments that have lower volatility than the stock market. so we have an overweight there. those investments i just spoke about, that's about 24% of our portfolio right now, and that's definitely helped us get through the last few weeks without giving up much of our gains. >> susie: tell us a little bit about -- well, you are on the buying side with equities, what are you buying? are you in u.s. stocks? international stocks? what is the mix? >> sure. one of the interesting things i think over the last few months, and maybe this isn't putting it very elegantly, but i like to think about it as revenge of the global investor. for all of 2011, and the start of 2012, we saw the s&p as one of the world's leading stock markets. and a lot of investors said, why don't i just own u.s. stocks and why bother with this global investing stuff. but
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama held firm on higher taxes for the wealthy today and said there's no evidence national security was breaed in the petraeus affair. both comments came in his first official news conference since the election. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight: we have extended excerpts of the president's wide-ranging exchange with reporters, from immigration to benghazi to reaching out to mitt romney. >> woodruff: we zero in on two topics, starting with the spiraling scandal that forced the c.i.a. director to step down. >> ifill: and we assess the administration's post-election enda with senators dick durbin and kay bailey hutchison. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez gets the latest on the escalating violence in gaza after israeli air strikes killed the military leader of hamas. >> ifill: plus, there were new calls today for laws to police pharmacies like the one linked to the meningitis outbreak. betty ann bowser's update includes the story of one family's loss from the dis
to their interest. barack obama is spending the day at the summit. he will meet with japanese prime minister. they are expecting to focus on a dispute over the islands in the east china sea. obama is expected to push for a peaceful resolution in line with international law. >>> japan's prime minister has praised myanmar's rapid reforms. he's offered a development loan worth $600 million. noda met the president on the sidelines. he said myanmar has made steady progress in political reform. he promises to support the country's economic development. >> translator: japan's public and private sectors will both back myanmar's reform effort. >> it will be the first loan in almost 26 years. they will use it to refurbish a power plant. they plan to invest in the commercial economic zone. japan's government will extend the loans in february of next year. they promise to make the country more attractive to foreign investors. >>> expecters in japan are hoping they will be able to shift more of their products to neighboring countries. exporters need any help they can get. >> not only that they are strugg
it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look a the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but inrestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes demographic information and the unemployment information doesn't always sync up. >> tom: timing is everything in terms of synching up for whoever wins next week and what party is in control of alcohol because they'll seemingl
house today, press secretary jay carney said president obama still has faith in general allen and is not contemplating shake-ups in his national security team. >> he's focused on th mssions that the military has passed with care... is tasked with carrying out and the c.i.a. and the general intelligence community, the tasks they're carrying out. and with enacting his overall agenda. >> brown: meanwhile the petraeus probe continued. f.b.i. agented searchd the home of paula broadwell in charlotte, north carolina late last night. at the u.s. capitol today, returning lawmakers were still looking for answers. one was republican senator susan collins of maine. >> i am puzzled by much of what has occurred in the f.b.i. investigation and also the latest information that perhaps general petraeus' friends had access to some classified information. we don't know whether that is true or not. >> brown: others including house minority leader nancy pelosi focused on why the f.b.i. did not officially inform congress about the petraeus matter much earlier. >> i think there's some answers that w
: that and more tonight on n.b.r.! >> susie: so far so good on the fiscal cliff. president obama and congressional leaders got off to a good start in their first round of negotiations. the president met with congressional leaders who emerged later to say they want to move quickly to prevent automatic spending cuts and tax increases from tanking the economy at the first of the year. but as darren gersh reports, what we are not yet clear about is whether either side is willing to give up enough to get the job done. >> reporter: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's
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